The DINOSAURS AT LARGE programme content is especially developed for the American Curriculum. It is uniquely designed to link the children’s work and studies to a central learning experience.

The Dinosaur theme brings relevance to the key learning areas across all elementary grades to ensure students gain absolute value from their participation in the presentation.

The Dinosaur at Large experience gives students a unique perspective which links modern and pre-historic times to the current issues of environmental awareness, climate change, global warming, extinction, and sustainability.

With over 100 educational worksheets, Dinosaur At Large is an ideal foundation for future classroom lessons and activities.

The program works within the following strands of the broad areas of learning during the presentation, and encourages students to learn and interact during the session in the following way.


By the end of the session, the students will have

    • Explored dinosaurs as real animals that once walked on the Earth a very long time ago, in much the same way as animals do today.
    • Learned that dinosaurs came in all shapes and sizes and that these different body types allowed them to survive in a variety of different environments and times.
    • Discovered that dinosaurs were not the only type of animal to live long ago, that other animals like reptiles, insects, fish, mammals etc. lived then as well, including animals that are still around today.
    • Seen that dinosaurs were divided into several very distinctive groups where different types of animals in the group acted and looked similar.
    • Learned that dinosaurs came in a vast variety of sizes, from chicken size to “four storey building” size, and that these sizes enabled them to eat different foods.
    • Explored the differences between meat-eaters and plant-eaters, how each feeds itself and how they were similar to animals of today.
    • Discussed how scientists find out extra information about extinct animals through looking at their footprints, eggs, skin prints and environment.
    • Explored the fact that paleontologists can work out what the whole animal probably looked like from just a few bones by comparing them to animals that have similar bones, and that they can try the same activity at home with a chicken.

Educational Outcomes

Science

K-4

Science As Inquiry

Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry.

Life Science

Life cycles of organisms.

Earth And Space Science

Changes in earth and sky.

Science And Technology

Abilities of technological design; Understanding about science and technology.

History Of Nature And Science

Science as a human endeavor.

5-8

Science As Inquiry

Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry.

Life Science

Diversity and adaptations of organisms.

Earth And Space Science

Earth’s history.

Science And Technology

Abilities of technological design; Understanding about science and technology.

History And Nature Of Science

Science as a human endeavor; History of science.

9-12

Science As Inquiry

Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry.

Life Science

Behavior of organisms

Earth And Space Science

Origin and evolution of the earth system.

Science And Technology

Abilities of technological design; Understanding about science and technology.

History And Nature Of Science

Science as a human endeavor; Historical perspectives.


Technology

Creativity and Innovation

Use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues.

Research and Information Fluency

Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.

Process data and report results.

Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making

Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.

Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.


Mathematics

Number and Operations

Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems.

Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another.

Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.

Algebra

Use mathematical models to represent and understand quantitative relationships.

Geometry

Apply transformations and use symmetry to analyze mathematical situations.

Use visualization, spatial reasoning, and geometric modeling to solve problems.

Measurement

Understand measurable attributes of objects and the units, systems, and processes of measurement

Apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements.

Data Analysis and Probability

Formulate questions that can be addressed with data and collect, organize, and display relevant data to answer them.

Select and use appropriate statistical methods to analyze data

Process

Reasoning and proof.

Connections.


Geography

Physical Systems

Understand the physical processes that shape the patterns of Earth’s surface.

The Uses of Geography

Understand how to apply geography to interpret the past.